GREVIN, J.

De venenis libri due. Gallice primum ab eo scripti, et à multis hactenus Latini desiderati, & nunc tandem opera & labore Hieremiae Martij Augustanae Reipublicae medici, in Latinum sermonem, summa fide & dilligentia, in rei medicae studiosorum utitlitatem atque commodum conversi. Quibus adiunctus est praetereà eiusdem auctoris de antimonio tractatus, eodem interprete, unà cum rerum memorabilium, praecipuè ad operis calcem, Indice.

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Antweriae, ex officina Chistophori Plantini, 1571. 4to (223 x 155mm). pp. (20), 332, (10), with 92 woodcuts in the text. Contemporary limp vellum (some damage to right upper corner of the frontcover).

The excellent woodcuts show snakes, amphibia, scorpions, fish, a dog suffering from rabies, poisonous plants etc.

First Latin edition of this important work on toxicology. The first French edition was published by Plantin in 1568. The present Latin edition was translated from the French by the Augsburg physician Hieremias Martius. Jacques Grevin (c. 1539-1570) was a French poet and dramatist and disciple of Ronsard. "Grevin was originally educated as a physician, and wrote several works on medical and scientific topics. His two books on poisons, while adding nothing new to toxicological knowledge, showed a distinctively skeptical and realistic attitude towards the writings of both classical and modern authors, with whom Grévin often disagreed. He also casts doubt on several superstitious beliefs, such as the efficacy of amulets against poison, or the turquoise's power to detect the presence of toxic substance. Two books on poisons was published with Grevin's verse translation of 'Theriaka' and 'Alexipharmaka', two didactic poems on poisonous plants and animals by the Hellenistic physician Nicander of Colophon (b. ca. A.D. 275)" ('The Haskell F. Norman library of Science & Medicine' 439, quoting the French edition).
The excellent woodcuts show snakes, amphibia, scorpions, fish, a dog suffering from rabies, poisonous plants etc.

Durling 2174; Nissen ZBI, 1713.